14.8.18

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Naga city - Cebu

 Naga City, is a component city in the province of Cebu, Philippines. According to the 2015 census it has a population of 115,750. In the 2016 electoral roll, it had 63,755 registered voters. 

The city of Naga lies within the Cebu metropolitan area. 

This City is often confused by visitors coming primarily from Luzon and other parts of the country not near to Central Visayas with the city of Naga in Camarines Sur. 

History
Even before the coming of the Spanish colonial government, Naga, which was then a flourishing village off the riverbanks of the storied Naga River, was already a thriving community. As pointed in the book of Prof. Danilo M. Gerona, a local historian, Naga was then a premier village with a comparatively sophisticated weaponry and surprisingly advanced technology. The name “Naga” derived its origin from the narra trees, which were then in abundance. Thus, in 1573, when the Spanish Troops arrived led by Capt. Juan de Salcedo, the colonizers were amazed to find a community with a fairly well advanced culture. In 1574, Captain Pedro de Chaves founded Ciudad de Nueva Caceres in honor of Don Francisco de Sande, then governor of the province and native of the City of Caceres in Spain. Naga, the premier native village and then a Spanish pueblo, formed part of the Spanish colonial city. Nueva Caceres remained the capital of Ambos Camarines provinces and later of the Camarines Sur province until the formal creation of the independent component city of Naga under the Philippine Republic. Naga’s birth as a chartered city formally took place on December 15, 1948 by virtue of Republic Act No. 305. Rep. Juan Q. Miranda sponsored this legislative act which put flesh into the city’s bid to become among the only few independent component cities in the country.

CIUDAD NIN NAGA has been for hundred of years a center of trade, education and culture, and the seat of governmental and ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

In 1573, on his second expedition to this region, the great conquestador, Juan de Salcedo, discovered here a flourishing Bikol Village called Naga, because it is said, of an abundance of Narra (naga in Bikol) trees about the place. In 1575 (200 years before the start of the American Revolution), Capt. Pedro de Chavez, the commander of the garrison left behind by Salcedo, founded on the site of the present business center (across the river from the original Naga) a Spanish city which he named Ciudad de Caceres, in honor of Francisco de Sande, the governor general and a native of the city of Caceres in Spain. It was still by this name that it was identified in the papal bull of August 14, 1595 that erected the See of Caceres (together with those of Cebu and Nueva Segobia) and made it the seat of the new bishopric.

In time, Spanish city and native village merged into one community and became popularly known as Nueva Caceres, obviously to distinguish it from its namesake in Spain. It had a city government as prescribed by Spanish law, with an ayuntamiento and cabildo of its own. At the beginning of the17th century, there were only five other ciudades in the Philippines.

With the advent of the American rule, it was reduced to a municipality. In 1919, it lost its Spanish name, when, by law, it became officially known as Naga. It acquired its present city charter in 1948, and its city government was inaugurated on December 15 of the same year.

The bishops of Caceres occupied a unique place in the Philippine Catholic hierarchy during most of the Spanish regime. By virtue of the papal brief of Gregory XIII, ecclesiastical cases originating in the Spanish Indies, which ordinarily were appealable to the Pope, were ordered to be terminated there and no longer elevated to Rome. Decisions of bishops were made appealable to the archbishop and those of the latter to the bishop of the nearest see. Thus, in the Philippines, the decisions of the archbishop of Manila were subject to review by the bishop of Caceres whose jurisdiction then extended to the province of Tayabas. In this sense, bishops of Bikol were delegates of the Pope and could be considered primates of the Church of the Philippines.

This was the reason why bishops of Caceres and archbishop of Manila were sometimes engaged in interesting controversies in the sensational Naga case and in such issues as canonical visitation and the secularization of the parishes.
As papal delegate, Bishop Francisco Gainza, then concurrently bishop of Caceres, sat in the special ecclesiastical tribunal which passed upon the civil authorities' petition to divert Fathers Burgos, Gomez, and Zamora of their priestly dignity. Gainza did not only refuse the petition but also urged their pardon.

Situated at the center of the Bikol peninsula and surrounded on all sides by rich agricultural, forest and fishing areas, Naga is also at the confluence of the Naga and Bikol Rivers. Thus, it has always been an ideal place for trade, and as center for schools and church and government offices.

In downtown Naga, just opposite Naga's tallest structure, the Holiday Hotel, you will see a park situated between Peñafrancia Ave. and Elias Angeles Street, and right in the middle of it the lofty monument to Bikol's Quince Martires. Actually, Bikol's martyrs of freedom number in the thousands but these fifteen have been specially singled out as symbols of the rest because on January 4, 1897, just five days after Dr. Rizal was executed, eleven of them were likewise shot at Bagumbayan field in Manila. The others died for country in exile or in prison.They were avenged, however, at the Peñafrancia Fiesta, September 18, 1898 for corporals Elias Angeles and Felix Plazo convinced their fellow members of the guardia civil not to allow the same fate to befall them as had befallen the Daet patriots. So on the night of the fiesta they attacked the Spanish officers' quarters, routed them and then did battle with the rest of the Spanish community who had established themselves in the convento of the historic San Francisco Church (just opposite the Quince Martires monuments, its old bell tower can still be seen). When word of this startling defeat reached Partido, Legazpi, Sorsogon and Catanduanes, all Spanish forces and governmental men withdraw to Iloilo. Sad to say, in January 1900, the American imperialistic forces invaded Camarines Sur and headed for Naga. However, Naga resident General Ludovico Arejola, organized a large guerilla army and fought the Americans at Agdangan, Baao. Afterwards he set up a camp in the mountains of Minalabac and held out for a full year and two and two months more, until rampant sickness forced the surrender of himself and his men in a formal ceremony in Naga on March 31, 1901. In late December 1941, Naga was again put under another foreign power, Japan, but once again on May 1 and 2, 1942; the combined guerilla forces of the province smashed their way into Naga. Their main purpose in doing so was to liberate the 30 American prisoners in the provincial jail. At the risk of their own lives and those of their relatives and neighbors not only freed, but also sheltered their former colonizers in the mountain. On April 9, 1945, a large number of Major Juan Q. Miranda's guerillas again attacked the Japanese forces in Naga. American planes also heavily bombed the city. The American army arrived finally on April 27. Naga became a chartered city in 1948. On the first decade of 1700's the first chapel to the Virgin Mary of Peñafrancia was constructed just above the city and along the banks of Naga River that is the avenue upon which the image is triumphantly borne from downtown Naga on the afternoon of Peñafrancia Saturday. This devotion is an authentic regional fiesta and the population of the city more than doubles on those days as pilgrims come from all over the six Bicol provinces as well as many from Manila and other distant places to share in this great religious experience and festival.Three (3) of the most venerable institutions and structures in Naga are clustered together along the upper part of Elias Angeles Street. They are the Cathedral that begun in the year 1816, the Holy Rosary Seminary and the Colegio de Sta. Isabel. Founded in 1793 as both a college and a seminary, The Holy Rosary Seminary is one of the oldest schools in the republic. It educated literally thousands of the sons of all the leading families from as far north as Mauban, Quezon, and as far south as Leyte. In 1925, the laymen’s department was separated from the seminary and became the Camarines Sur Catholic Academy, which in turn, in 1940 became the Ateneo de Naga. Naga Parochial School took over the training of the elementary boys in 1948.

In 1868, the first normal school for women in the entire Orient was established in Naga as the Colegio de Sta. Isabel. Each parish in Bikol was required to send at least one pensionada to study there that they might be trained to run the parochial school in their own home place. The colegio’s present day population of more than 5,000 shows the appreciation of the Bikol people for its century of work for Bikol youth.The University of Nueva Caceres, adjacent to Naga’s Centro, is the first university in southern Luzon. Over 9,000 students are being trained “non scholae ser vitae” in its halls. Students come from as far south as Zamboanga to attend its law, engineering, commerce, liberal arts courses. Its Bicol Museum is the best in the entire Peninsula.

Naga has a multitude of other fine schools: Naga College Foundation, Camarines Sur National High School, Bicol College of Arts and Trade, Naga City Science High School, St. Joseph School, Hope Christian School, Philippine Union College and many energetic business and fashion academies.

Cityhood
During the 11th Congress (1998–2001), Congress enacted into law 33 bills converting 33 municipalities into cities. However, Congress did not act on a further 24 bills converting 24 other municipalities into cities.
During the 12th Congress (2001–2004), Congress enacted into law Republic Act No. 9009 (RA 9009), which took effect on 30 June 2001. RA 9009 amended Section 450 of the Local Government Code by increasing the annual income requirement for conversion of a municipality into a city from ₱20 million to ₱100 million. The rationale for the amendment was to restrain, in the words of Senator Aquilino Pimentel, "the mad rush" of municipalities to convert into cities solely to secure a larger share in the Internal Revenue Allotment despite the fact that they are incapable of fiscal independence.
After RA 9009 went into effect, the House of Representatives of the 12th Congress adopted Joint Resolution No. 29, which sought to exempt from the ₱100 million income requirement in RA 9009 the 24 municipalities whose cityhood bills were not approved in the 11th Congress. However, the 12th Congress ended without the Senate having approved Joint Resolution No. 29.
During the 13th Congress (2004–2007), the House of Representatives re-adopted former Joint Resolution No. 29 as Joint Resolution No. 1 and forwarded it to the Senate for approval. However, the Senate again failed to approve the Joint Resolution. Following the suggestion of Senator Aquilino Pimentel (Senate President), 16 municipalities filed, through their respective sponsors, individual cityhood bills. The 16 cityhood bills each contained a common provision exempting it from the ₱100 million income requirement of RA 9009 –
"Exemption from Republic Act No. 9009. — The City of x x x shall be exempted from the income requirement prescribed under Republic Act No. 9009."
On 22 December 2006, the House of Representatives approved the cityhood bills. The Senate also approved the cityhood bills in February 2007, except that of Naga, Cebu which was passed on 7 June 2007. These cityhood bills lapsed into law on various dates from March to July 2007 after President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo failed to sign them.
Cityhood was ratified in a plebiscite on 2 September 2007. The point of law at issue in 2007 was whether there had been a breach of Section 10, Article X of the 1987 Constitution, which provides –
No province, city, municipality, or barangay shall be created, divided, merged, abolished or its boundary substantially altered, except in accordance with the criteria established in the local government code and subject to approval by a majority of the votes cast in a plebiscite in the political units directly affected.
– and in each case the established criteria were far from met.
In November 2008, Naga and 15 other cities lost their cityhood after the Supreme Court of the Philippines granted a petition filed by the League of Cities of the Philippines, and declared unconstitutional the cityhood law (RA 9491) which had allowed the town to acquire its city status. The Supreme Court ruled that they did not pass the requirements for cityhood.
On 10 December 2008, the 16 cities affected acting together filed a motion for reconsideration with the Supreme Court. More than a year later, on 22 December 2009, acting on said appeal, the Court reversed its earlier ruling as it ruled that "at the end of the day, the passage of the amendatory law" (regarding the criteria for cityhood as set by Congress) "is no different from the enactment of a law, i.e., the cityhood laws specifically exempting a particular political subdivision from the criteria earlier mentioned. Congress, in enacting the exempting law/s, effectively decreased the already codified indicators. Accordingly cityhood status was restored.
But on 27 August 2010, the 16 cities lost their city status again, after the Supreme Court voted 7-6, with two justices not taking part, to reinstate the 2008 decision declaring as "unconstitutional" the Republic Acts that converted the 16 municipalities into cities. A previous law required towns aspiring to become cities to earn at least ₱100 million annually, which none of the 16 did.
On 15 February 2011, the Supreme Court made another volte-face and upheld for the third time the cityhood of 16 towns in the Philippines.
Finally, on 12 April 2011, the Supreme Court, in an en banc ruling delivered in Baguio City, affirmed the finality of the constitutionality of the 16 cityhood laws by resolving that:
We should not ever lose sight of the fact that the 16 cities covered by the Cityhood Laws not only had conversion bills pending during the 11th Congress, but have also complied with the requirements of the LGC prescribed prior to its amendment by R.A. No. 9009. Congress undeniably gave these cities all the considerations that justice and fair play demanded. Hence, this Court should do no less by stamping its imprimatur to the clear and unmistakable legislative intent and by duly recognizing the certain collective wisdom of Congress. WHEREFORE, the Ad Cautelam Motion for Reconsideration (of the Decision dated 15 February 2011) is denied with finality.
On 28 June 2011 the Supreme Court directed the Clerk of Court to issue the entry of judgment on the cityhood case of 16 municipalities.

11.8.18

Himamaylan city

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 Himamaylan City, is a 3rd class city in the province of Negros Occidental, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 106,880 people.

This component city located is 83 kilometres (52 mi) south of Bacolod City, the provincial capital. Due to its coastal location, it is a rich source of different types of seafood, mainly fish, oysters, mussels and shrimps. The city celebrates the Himaya-an Festival every April 14-25.

Himamaylan became a city on March 5, 2001, through a proclamation by President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo under Republic Act No. 9028. It is the only city in the 5th District of Negros Occidental.


The term "Himamaylan" is a portmanteau of the two Hiligaynon words hima and babaylan. It is alleged that the settlement's early Malay inhabitants suffered from a foot malady called hima, and their employment of witch doctors called babaylan caused the Spanish occupiers to call them Himamaylan.

Geography

Himamaylan is located at the center-most cove on the coastline of Negros Island. Himamaylan has a natural harbor characterized by deep waters favorable to access by marine vessels.

Located in the center of the island, the city is conducive to operations reaching all parts of the country and the rest of Southeast Asia from a strategic point. Most portions of the city are plains and generally have fertile soil, conducive for agriculture. The city's rivers are 12 feet (3.7 m) or deeper, providing drainage for farmland.

History

In 1795, Himamaylan became the capital of Negros.[6] At that time, the city served as a garrison for occupying Spanish forces. Today, the old Spanish-built fort constructed as a lookout point for frequent Muslim raids is one of the historical attractions found in the city. In the middle part of 1565, the Spaniards came and subjugated Himamaylan. They introduced Encomienda System by which a piece of land including its products and other resources, and its inhabitants were granted to members of the conquering force as their puppets. The first Spanish priest, constructed a makeshift church and gathered the native which they later called “Himaya”, a thanksgiving for driving the “Hima” away. Himaya was also a place for spiritual paradise to the Babaylan. They later called “Himaya” as Himamaya-an or Himamaylan, but because of the tongue twisting sound of its syllables which the priest find difficulty in pronouncing, they changed the word to Himamaylan to suit their diction. The name Himamaylan was adopted officially when the place was founded into a township or pueblo. Thus, the town got its name both from historical and dialectical origin.

Himamaylan was founded in the 18th century. Although there was no definite record found, it became the second capital of Negros Island from 1795-1849; first being Municipality of Ilog. The town’s historical landmark, the Spanish Kota (Fortress) was the seat of the Old Spanish Government. It was also the place where many natives were cured of their sickness and consequently converted to Christianity.

Himamaylan’s historical records showed that in 1565 when the Spaniards came, there spur a quantum jump in the people’s religious life. From a pagan life, fresh arterial blood pumped into the multiplying discipline. In a span of only a few years after Spanish Colonization, embracing the Catholic Faith, the dame dramatic transformation continued to happen that even intellectuals of today is mystified in their own findings and misbelief that they were naturally drawn to the faith.

On November 4, 1898, the revolutionary forces in Himamaylan received orders from Gen. Juan Araneta to dislodge the Spanish Soldiers stationed in the town on November 5, and the rest of the towns in Negros. Due to lack of weapons they were not able to carry out the order and it was only on 8 November 1898 when the Deputy Commander for Southern Negros in the person of Gen. Rafael Ramos showed the Spanish Corporal a copy of the Act of Capitulation, that the Spanish Soldiers surrendered, thus, making Himamaylan as the last town to have been liberated from the Spanish Government.

When the Americans came on December 28, 1898, they easily capitulated the island of Negros from the Spanish Colonizers, thereby establishing the American Rule in the whole island.

In the year 1942, after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor to the Japanese forces, three days after Negros Occidental also fall, thus, the Japanese Military Government was established in the whole province. The guerrilla resistance fighters and local soldiers of the Philippine Commonwealth Army military units was encounter siege around the municipality of Himamaylan was attacking Japanese soldiers from 1942 to 1945 until the retreating guerrillas by the Japanese. On 1945, Filipino and American soldiers aiding recognized guerrillas liberated the municipality of Himamaylan and defeating Japanese forces and ended in World War II.

In year 1998 brought good luck and hope to all Himamaylanon as he successfully steer the Municipality into becoming a first City in the 5th district with the approval (98%)of the people in a plebiscite held 31 March 2001. On the 5 March 2001 at 10:00 A.M., the Republic Act No. 9028, “An Act Converting the Municipality of Himamaylan, Province of Negros Occidental into a component City of Himamaylan”, was signed in a ceremony at the Heroes Hall of Malacañang Palace.

The city's main sources of livelihood include fishery, sugarcane farming and sugar production, rice farming, mango cultivation and ethanol exports.

Ilagan city

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Ilagan city is a 2nd class city and capital of the province of Isabela, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 145,568 people  making it the most populous city in the province.

With a total land area of 116,626 hectares (288,190 acres), it is the largest city in the island of Luzon and the fourth largest city in land area in the Philippines, after Davao City, Puerto Princesa and Zamboanga City. It holds the title as the most number of voters in the province with 88,413 voters.

Ilagan was a first class municipality before it become a city.

History

The town was then called by its native Gaddang settlers as Bolo during the pre-Spanish conquest era. It is one of the populous settlement during that period and site of the vast tobacco plantation in the region making it one of the most important economic areas in northern Luzon. Shortly after Juan de Salcedo conquered Northern Luzon in 1587, Gov. Rodrigo de Penalosa sent Capt. Pablo de Carreon to explore Cagayan Valley as well as to establish missions in towns. Among the Spanish missionaries who penetrated deeply into the region was P. Pedro Jimenez, who founded Ilagan.

The town of Bolo was founded by the Dominicans in 1619 in honor of Saint Ferdinand of Castile. The old Bolo was situated in the western side of Cagayan River in what is known today as Barangay Naguilian-Baculod. The cultural shock brought by the dominating social and economic regulations introduced by the Spanish authorities propelled the natives to dissent in the Mallig and Ilagan-Tumauini territories in what was known as the Gaddang Revolution. The natives abandoned their settlement after burning their church and houses until 1622 when the Spanish government pardoned and exempted them from paying tribute within three years. After the Gaddang revolt, the natives re-established their settlement upon the efforts of Fr. Pedro Jimenez in 1678 on the east side of the river thereby giving the legendary name for Ilagan which is the reverse of the word Nagali meaning "transfer". The Dominicans accepted the settlement as an ecclesiastical mission given the name San Fernando de Ilagan in honor of its patron, Saint Ferdinand of Castile.

On May 4, 1686, Ilagan was founded and missionaries converted the natives to Christianity. Ilagan was made the capital of Cagayan Valley when Brig. Manuel Sanchez Mira was then the governor of the whole territory. Ilagan was the scene of the 1763 revolt in Isabela led by Dabo and Marayag against the collection of tribute, the enforcement of tobacco monopoly committed by the friars during the Spanish occupation. Upon the separation of Isabela on May 1, 1856, Ilagan became the capital of the province.

On August 4, 1901 the American occupation under the United States-Philippine Commission has enacted the Provincial Government Act 210 that has re-established Isabela and other provinces in the Philippines. Rafael Maramag, a former municipal president (mayor) of Ilagan was appointed as the first governor. The act then re-established Ilagan as the provincial capital.

On November 13, 1925, Gaffud has approved a resolution filed by all "Municipal Presidents of the Isabela" (the counterpart of the present-day Mayors' League) following a four-day convention. The resolution called for the erection of a monument in honor of the country's National Hero José Rizal in the old Ilagan public plaza in Barangay Bagumbayan. By the turn of the 1950s the new Poblacion was located uphill from the old Saint Ferdinand Parish Church (formerly known as Saint Ferdinand Cathedral in Barangay Bagumbayan) to Barangay San Vicente; site of the current City Hall.

Incorporation as a city

Ilagan has attempted to gain cityhood status at least five times in its history:

During the Spanish colonization period, Ilagan applied to gain cityhood status from the Spanish Government but was unsuccessful. Ilagan could have been the second city of the Philippines after Nueva Segovia, now Lal-Lo, Cagayan.
During the administration of then Mayor Paguirigan, but was shelved during the American occupation.
On February 2, 1998, congress passed Republic Act No. 8474 which sought to convert Ilagan into a city. But the plebiscite held on March 14, 1999 turned down its bid for cityhood under the administration of then Mayor Mercedes P. Uy. The majority of the people voted no in that event.
During the administration of then Mayor Delfinito "Jojo" C. Albano, Ilagan's cityhood status did not push through when the mayor was gunned down by three unidentified men in the night of June 27, 2006 in Quezon City. Mayor Albano used the term C-U-DAD Ilagan for campaigning the cityhood status of Ilagan.
In 2012, the leaders of Ilagan, led by then Isabela 1st District Representative Rodolfo Albano Sr., renewed its bid for its cityhood. Former Isabela Vice Governor Rodolfo T. Albano III said that, "The provincial government fully supports Ilagan’s renewed cityhood bid, considering that such goal is already long overdue". Former Department of Justice Secretary Silvestre Bello III expressed support to the renewed move of the local officials of Ilagan, Isabela, headed by then Mayor Josemarie L. Diaz, for the town’s conversion into a city.[11] On May 22, 2012, the congress approved the cityhood bill of Ilagan on its House Resolution No. 144 and was signed by His Excellency, then President Benigno Aquino III. Plebiscite was held on August 11, 2012, with a majority of votes voting "yes". By virtue of Republic Act 10169, Ilagan was then proclaimed as a new component city, the third in the province of Isabela and the fourth in Cagayan Valley on the same day by COMELEC Commissioner Armando Velasco.
On August 11, 2015, marked another day in the history of Ilagan as the Department of Agriculture proclaimed the city as the new Corn Capital of the Philippines during its third cityhood anniversary. Former Sec. Proceso Alcala was represented by then Asec. Edilberto M. De Luna who travelled all the way to Ilagan to attend the momentous event.

Geography


Ilagan is located on the central portion of the province of Isabela. It is bounded by 9 municipalities: on the north by the municipalities of Divilacan, Tumauini, and Delfin Albano; on the west by the municipality of Quirino; on the east by the municipalities of Divilacan, Palanan, and the Pacific Ocean; and on the south by the municipalities of Gamu, Naguilian, Benito Soliven and San Mariano. Ilagan is approximately 96 kilometres (60 mi) from Tuguegarao and 397 kilometres (247 mi) from Metro Manila (linked by a national highway via Santa Fe, Nueva Vizcaya).

Land
Of the total 1,166.26 km2 land area of Ilagan; 31% are agricultural, 36% are forest areas and the remaining 33% are build-up areas and open grassland areas that are available for industrial, commercial and residential uses.[15] Of all cities in the country, Ilagan ranks as the top producer of corn. As an agriculture-based city, it produces ample supply of corn, rice, vegetables and legumes. Fruits like the banana are year-round products especially in the mountainous areas of the city. Ilagan also produces seasonal fruits such as mangoes and pomelo. The Cagayan Valley Research Center (CVRC) is the primary plant breeding institution in Region 02. It is located in Barangay San Felipe along National Highway. Ilagan has rich forest resources. Hectares of forest land are strictly protected by authorities like the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), several NGOs and the Local Government Unit.

Demographics

In the 2015 census, the population of Ilagan, was 145,568 people,[3] with a density of 120 inhabitants per square kilometre or 310 inhabitants per square mile.

The rapid increase of population in Ilagan is attributed to the current growth of economic activities specially in the sectors of Commerce, Industry, Agriculture and Housing. Ilagan is one of the 145 emerging cities in the Philippines with more than 100,000 residents.[20] Statistics from the Philippine Statistics Authority show that Ilagan had a population 131,24311 in 2007, which increased to 135,174 people in the 2010 census making Ilagan as the most populous city in the province of Isabela and the second in Cagayan Valley after Tuguegarao.

Religion

Ilagan's population is predominantly Roman Catholic. The Diocese of Ilagan has 39 catholic churches all over the province of Isabela. There are also Protestants, Baptist, Church of Christ, Adventists, Born Again groups, Victory Christian Fellowship, Latter Day Saints, Jehovah's Witnesses, Islam, and Philippine-based groups like Iglesia Ni Cristo and Ang Dating Daan that accounts to the city's population. These religious organizations have their own temples and churches sparsely located in the city. Some Ilagueños were converted to Islam where their mosque is found in Barangay Baligatan.

Economy

Agriculture and fishery remains to be the main backbone of Ilagan's economy. There are almost 23,803 hectares that are basically cultivated land and 314 hectares are utilized for fish culture. However, the suitable farm area of Ilagan is 32,153.19 hectares potentials for crops, livestock and fish production. This figure shows that a significant percentage (24.99%) is not being fully utilized for agricultural production leaving them idle and under utilized.

Commerce and trade is the second economic based income of the people of Ilagan. In the year 2006, statistics showed that there are currently 1,795 registered business establishments. For year 2000, commercial trade was at 1,996 revealing that there were more or less than 201 establishments that had been closed down within the period 2000–2006. There were even more establishments in 1995 with a total of 1,877 in all. The trend shows that from 1995 to 2000, there was a growth of 2.94%, but from 2000 to 2006 a decreasing growth rate of -1.75% was registered. Just like the past years, for the year 2006, commercial activities within the municipality are classified into wholesale, retail and service-oriented businesses.

The industrial sector of the municipal economy comprises 210 establishments in year 2006 as compared with 207 in 2000. This reflects a 2.4% increase in industrial activities over a period of six years (2000–2006). The existing industries are mostly on a micro scale except for the Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines, Inc. located in Barangay Guinatan which is the only significant employment generator within the locality at that time. Following the previous year’s trend, industries currently operating are agro-industries, wood-based manufacturing or service-oriented industries.

The commercial area includes areas which are occupied by public markets, wholesale and retail stores, restaurants, banks, shops and other establishments or structures engaged in commercial activities. The bulk of those who are engaged in trade and commerce are found in the public markets. The area covered by the commercial area is approximately 90.56 hectares or 2.62% of the urban core.

As compared to the 2000 existing commercial area of 17 hectares, the increase of 73.56 hectares in 2007 is an indication that Ilagan is racing towards commercialization.

The transformation of Ilagan into a fast growing municipality in Cagayan Valley became evident upon the assumption in office of then Mayor Josemarie L. Diaz, the re-structuring of the economic landscape of the municipality and the eventual transformation of its business climate into a business friendly environment successfully lured multi-national companies in investing their capitals into its market. Economic boom began to ingulf Ilagan with the entry of eight (8) banks and financial institutions in just a number of months.

The Local Government of Ilagan responded positively with these developments by the enactment of legislative measures including the provision of the Investment Incentive Code which provided for tax incentives to investments. These measures eventually opened the flood gates for big investments to enter the local market that included the establishments of malls like the Northstar Mall and Talavera Square Mall that house the Savemore, Robinsons Supermarket, Puregold, Jollibee, McDonald's, Red Ribbon, Goldilocks, Mang Inasal, Greenwich, Chowking and many other stores.

At present, Ilagan has one of the fastest-growing economy in the province of Isabela as well as in the whole Cagayan Valley over the past years. The city is the primary growth center and investment hub of the Cagayan Valley region due to the rapid commercialization and stabilization of the different sectors involved in its economy. It has two major public markets which is the old Pamilihang Bayan ng Ilagan located in Centro Poblacion (now called Xentro Market) moved to barangay San Vicente to give way for the construction of Xentro Mall and the multi-million pesos New Ilagan Public Market Complex in Barangay Baligatan. In front of the public market is a three-storey structure called as Ilagan City Mall, the first LGU-owned and operated mall in the city. The increasing number of market goers coming from the different regions of the city and adjacent municipalities, prompted city officials to facilitate the construction of the modern market. Ilagan is home to almost fifteen (15) banks which is primarily composed of universal, commercial, savings and rural banks. There are also thousands of commercial establishments composed of distributors, retail and wholesale. Pawnshops, lending companies, insurance agencies, cooperatives and other financial institutions are spread all over the city.

Iligan city

 Iligan City, is a 1st class highly urbanized city in Northern Mindanao, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 342,618 people.

It is geographically within the province of Lanao del Norte but administered independently from the province. It was once part of Central Mindanao (Region 12) until the province was moved under Northern Mindanao (Region 10) in 2001.

Iligan has a total land area of 813.37 square kilometres (314.04 sq mi), making it one of the 10 largest cities in the Philippines in terms of land area. It had a population of 342,618 inhabitants in the 2015 census.

The name Iligan is from the Higaunon (Lumad/Native of Iligan) word "Ilig" which means "to go downstream".


History

ligan City had its beginnings in the village of Bayug, four (4) kilometers north of the present Poblacion. It was the earliest pre-Spanish settlement of native sea dwellers. In the later part of the 16th century, the inhabitants were subdued by the Visayan migrants from the island-nation called the Kedatuan of Dapitan, on Panglao island.

In the accounts of Jesuit historian Francisco Combes, the Mollucan Sultan of Ternate invaded Panglao. This caused the Dapitans to flee in large numbers to a re-established Dapitan, Zamboanga del Norte.

In Dapitan, the surviving Datu of Panglao Pagbuaya, received Legazpi's expedition in 1595. Later, Pagbuaya's son Manook was baptized Pedro Manuel Manook. Sometime afterwards in by the end of the 16th century after 1595 Manook subdued the higaunon (animist) village of Bayug and turned it into one of the earliest Christian settlements in the country. The settlement survived other raids from other enemies, especially Muslims of Lanao, and the early Iliganons moved their settlement from Bayug to Iligan, which the Augustinian Recollects founded as a mission in 1609.

Spanish era

The Jesuits replaced the Recollects in 1639. Iligan was the Spaniards' base of operations in attempting to conquer and Christianize the Lanao area throughout its history. A stone fort called Fort St. Francis Xavier was built in 1642 where Iliganons sought refuge during raids by bandits. But the fort sank due to floods. Another fort was built and this was named Fort Victoria or Cota de Iligan.

In 1850, because of floods, Don Remigio Cabili, then Iligan's governadorcillo, built another fort and moved the poblacion of the old Iligan located at the mouth of Tubod River west of the old market to its present site.

Camp Overton in 1900, an American Armybase, currently the location of Global Steel Philippines Inc.
Iligan was already a town of the once undivided Misamis Province in 1832. However, it did not have an independent religious administration because it was part of Cagayan de Oro, the provincial capital. It was one of the biggest municipalities of Misamis Province.

The Spaniards abandoned Iligan in 1899, paving the way for the landing of the American forces in 1900.

 American era

In 1903, the Moro Province was created. Iligan, because of its Moro residents, was taken away from the Misamis Province. Then Iligan became the capital of the Lanao District and seat of the government where the American officials lived and held office. Later in 1907 the capital of the Lanao District was transferred to Dansalan.

In 1914, under the restructuring of Moroland after the end of the Moro Province (1903–1913), Iligan became a municipality composed of eight barrios together with the municipal district of Mandulog. After enjoying peace and prosperity for about 40 years, Iligan was invaded by Japanese forces in 1942.

The liberation in Iligan by the Philippine Commonwealth forces attacked by the Japanese held sway in the city until 1944 to 1945 when the war ended. On November 15, 1944, the city held a Commonwealth Day parade to celebrate the end of Japanese atrocities and occupation.

Cityhood

Using the same territorial definition as a municipality, Iligan became a chartered city of Lanao del Norte on June 16, 1950. It was declared a first class city in 1969 and was reclassified as First Class City "A" on July 1, 1977 by virtue of Presidential Decree No. 465. In 1983, Iligan was again reclassified as a highly urbanized city.

Lone district
Republic Act No. 9724, an Act separating the City of Iligan from the First Legislative District of the Province of Lanao del Norte was approved by President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo on October 20, 2009.

Geography

Iligan City is bounded on the north by the 3 municipalities of Misamis Oriental (namely Lugait, Manticao and Opol), to the south by the 3 municipalities of Lanao del Norte (Baloi, Linamon and Tagoloan) and the 2 municipalities of Lanao del Sur (Kapai and Tagoloan II), to the north-east by Cagayan de Oro City, to the east by the municipality of Talakag, Bukidnon; and to the west by Iligan Bay.

To the west, Iligan Bay provides ferry and container ship transportation. East of the city, flat cultivated coastal land gives way to steep volcanic hills and mountains providing the waterfalls and cold springs for which the area is well known.

Demographics

Iligan is predominantly Christian (93.61%). Iliganons are composed of a Cebuano-speaking majority and local minorities mainly Maranaos and Higaonons.

Some Tagalogs, other cultural minorities and immigrants from other places also inhabit Iligan. It is not only rich in natural resources and industries but it is also the home of a mix of cultures: the Maranaos of Lanao, the Higaonon of Bukidnon, and many settlers and migrants from other parts of the country. It is known for its diverse culture.

Language
Cebuano is the major language in the city (92.27%). The rest speak Maranao, Tagalog, Hiligaynon, Ilocano, Chavacano, and Waray-Waray. The majority of the population can speak and understand English.

Economy

Iligan is known as the Industrial Center of the South and its economy is largely based on heavy industries. It produces hydroelectric power for the Mindanao region through the National Power Corporation (NAPOCOR), the site of the Mindanao Regional Center (MRC) housing Agus IV, VI and VII hydroelectric plants. It also houses industries like steel, tinplate, cement and flour mills.

After the construction of Maria Cristina (Agus VI) Hydroelectric Plant by National Power Corporation (NPC, NAPOCOR) in 1950, the city experienced rapid industrialization and continued until the late 1980s. The largest steel plant in the country, National Steel Corporation (NSC), was also established in 1962.

During the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, the city experienced severe economic slowdown. A number of industrial plants were closed, notably the National Steel Corporation.

The city made its economic revival with the reopening of the National Steel Corporation, renamed Global Steelworks Infrastructures, Inc. (GSII) in 2004.[18] On October 2005, GSII officially took a new corporate name: Global Steel Philippines (SPV-AMC), Inc.

10.8.18

Guihulngan City



Guihulngan City is a 5th class city in the province of Negros Oriental, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 95,969 people, the third-most populous city in Negros Oriental after the cities of Dumaguete and Bayawan.

History

There are several versions how the city derived its name. The first, according to old tales, was attributed to a river flowing directly to the town proper from the main spring in sitio Anahaw, Barangay Nagsaha, hence the name "GUIPADULNGAN" which means the point where the river flows to an end.

The second is associated with the gruesome incident in the 19th Century when the Philippines was a colony of Spain; men and women of different ages were said to be captured, beheaded and thrown into the sea by the Moros, now known as Tañon Strait. Other accounts claim that the Moro invaders dropped a bell into the sea when they found out that it was used by the lookout to warn the townsfolk of their coming. Since that time, the place has been called "GUIHULUGAN" which means, "Place where a thing was dropped". But in the Spanish writing, "U" and "N" are similar, which is why it became commonly written and known as GUIHULNGAN.

Whether it originated as "GUIPADULNGAN" or "GUIHULNGAN", the name is indeed symbolic, as the town is “dropped” with abundant blessings from the Almighty for a significant "end".

Cityhood

During the 11th Congress (1998–2001), Congress enacted into law 33 bills converting 33 municipalities into cities. However, Congress did not act on a further 24 bills converting 24 other municipalities into cities.

During the 12th Congress (2001–2004), Congress enacted into law Republic Act No. 9009 (RA 9009), which took effect on 30 June 2001. RA 9009 amended Section 450 of the Local Government Code by increasing the annual income requirement for conversion of a municipality into a city from ₱20 million to ₱100 million. The rationale for the amendment was to restrain, in the words of Senator Aquilino Pimentel, "the mad rush" of municipalities to convert into cities solely to secure a larger share in the Internal Revenue Allotment despite the fact that they are incapable of fiscal independence.

After RA 9009 went into effect, the House of Representatives of the 12th Congress adopted Joint Resolution No. 29, which sought to exempt from the ₱100 million income requirement in RA 9009 the 24 municipalities whose cityhood bills were not approved in the 11th Congress. However, the 12th Congress ended without the Senate having approved Joint Resolution No. 29.

During the 13th Congress (2004–2007), the House of Representatives re-adopted former Joint Resolution No. 29 as Joint Resolution No. 1 and forwarded it to the Senate for approval. However, the Senate again failed to approve the Joint Resolution. Following the suggestion of Senator Aquilino Pimentel (Senate President), 16 municipalities filed, through their respective sponsors, individual cityhood bills. The 16 cityhood bills each contained a common provision exempting it from the ₱100 million income requirement of RA 9009 –

"Exemption from Republic Act No. 9009. — The City of x x x shall be exempted from the income requirement prescribed under Republic Act No. 9009."

On 22 December 2006, the House of Representatives approved the cityhood bills. The Senate also approved the cityhood bills in February 2007, except that of Naga, Cebu which was passed on 7 June 2007. These cityhood bills lapsed into law on various dates from March to July 2007 after President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo failed to sign them.

Guihulngan was already the largest municipality in Negros Oriental when, in July 2007, a popular referendum was passed declaring it a city.[5]The point of law at issue in 2007 was whether there had been a breach of Section 10, Article X of the 1987 Constitution, which provides –

No province, city, municipality, or barangay shall be created, divided, merged, abolished or its boundary substantially altered, except in accordance with the criteria established in the local government code and subject to approval by a majority of the votes cast in a plebiscite in the political units directly affected.

– and in each case the established criteria were far from met.

In November 2008, Guihulngan and 15 other cities lost their cityhood after the Supreme Court of the Philippines granted a petition filed by the League of Cities of the Philippines, and declared unconstitutional the cityhood law (RA 9409) which had allowed the town to acquire its city status. The Supreme Court ruled that they did not pass the requirements for cityhood.

On 10 December 2008, the 16 cities affected acting together filed a motion for reconsideration with the Supreme Court. More than a year later, on 22 December 2009, acting on said appeal, the Court reversed its earlier ruling as it ruled that "at the end of the day, the passage of the amendatory law" (regarding the criteria for cityhood as set by Congress) "is no different from the enactment of a law, i.e., the cityhood laws specifically exempting a particular political subdivision from the criteria earlier mentioned. Congress, in enacting the exempting law/s, effectively decreased the already codified indicators. Accordingly cityhood status was restored.

But on 27 August 2010, the 16 cities lost their city status again, after the Supreme Court voted 7-6, with two justices not taking part, to reinstate the 2008 decision declaring as "unconstitutional" the Republic Acts that converted the 16 municipalities into cities. A previous law required towns aspiring to become cities to earn at least ₱100 million annually, which none of the 16 did.

On 15 February 2011, the Supreme Court made another volte-face and upheld for the third time the cityhood of 16 towns in the Philippines.

Finally, on 12 April 2011, the Supreme Court, in an en banc ruling delivered in Baguio City, affirmed the finality of the constitutionality of the 16 cityhood laws by resolving that:

We should not ever lose sight of the fact that the 16 cities covered by the Cityhood Laws not only had conversion bills pending during the 11th Congress, but have also complied with the requirements of the LGC prescribed prior to its amendment by R.A. No. 9009. Congress undeniably gave these cities all the considerations that justice and fair play demanded. Hence, this Court should do no less by stamping its imprimatur to the clear and unmistakable legislative intent and by duly recognizing the certain collective wisdom of Congress. WHEREFORE, the Ad Cautelam Motion for Reconsideration (of the Decision dated 15 February 2011) is denied with finality.

On 28 June 2011 the Supreme Court directed the Clerk of Court to issue the entry of judgment on the cityhood case of 16 municipalities.

Gingoog City

Geographical location

The city is located on the northeastern coast of the Province of Misamis Oriental, Region 10. It is 122 kilometers from the regional center of Cagayan de Oro City and 74 kilometers West of Butuan City. It lies within the grid coordinates 124°57” East Longitude and 8°52” North Latitude. It is bounded on the North by Gingoog bay; on the East by the Municipality of Magsaysay and the Province of Agusan del Norte; on the West by the Municipalities of Claveria and Medina and on the South by Agusan del Sur.

The city occupies an area of 769.88 square kms. (76,988 hectares)

History

Looking back in pre-Hispanic era, Gingoog originates from a thriving Manobo settlement in the area presently situated by Barangay Daan Lungsod. With influx of migrants as years passed, the settlers decided to transfer to a wider area for settlement.

A spacious or wider area with room for growth and expansion was considered by the settlers at Gahub-Mangiskis, beside the river and the seashore.

Gingoog became a Spanish pueblo in 1868 and became a municipality in 1903 under the United States administration. During this period the town’s economic growth was spurred by agricultural development and the benefits of forest product/wood-based production by then Sta. Clara and thence Anakan Lumber Company logging operations and the Mindanao Plywood Corporation.

On June 18, 1960 Gingoog became a Charter City. From third Class, Gingoog city became First Class city in 1982 and continued on to be adjudged Most Outstanding Component City of Region 10 in 1984.

Before the city was served its light and power needs by MORESCO II on December 17, 1978, CEPALCO, a private service firm cater to the city’s needs until the former withdraw its services for reasons leaving the latter experiencing dark nights.

A decade later, the city saw the massive rural road development program connecting circumferential al-weather and dirt roads at least connecting remote barangays to the main routes to the city. Rural electrification has also started that gained momentum in the start of the 21st Century that presently hundred per cent of the rural barangays are “switched on”.

During the period also, the forest product or wood-based companies have ceased operations in the city while the city wharf services also was gone as boats stop calling port as shippers preferred the proliferating services of the “door to door” delivery container vans from the ports of Cagayan de Oro and Nasipit.

The proposed Gingoog River Mini Hydro Project was already hatched and has been toying in the dreams and aspirations of past and present leaders with complete pre-FS documents and series of technical surveys of the area proposed. The idea has always become a political issue each and every election year each making the electorate callused or incentive dismissing it as mere propaganda as nothing actually happened.

At present, towards 2010 and onward, the city’s stance is to develop the potentials of the areas of tourism. It was painfully accepted that with the absence of drivers for vigorous industries and manufacturing ventures, the city is unable to compete with the highly urbanized neighbors who ere strategically located at the gates of transport networks for commerce and industry.

In that direction, the present administration is vent on installing tourist-oriented facilities and infra-supports while offering tax incentives to potential investors. Much effort was exerted and resources directed towards identifying potential area for economic growth in that stance. The laudable efforts of the current LCE has greatly changed the facade and overlaying suburbs signifying shift and change and sent positive signal to investors that friendly environs for investment has actually been manifest.


Climate

Based on PAGASA data, the hottest month is observed in May with an average temperature of 28.95ºC while the month of January is the coolest with an average temperature of 26.60 ºC.

In terms of surface wind circulation pattern, oceanographic data reveals that the coast of Gingoog is greatly influenced by the monsoon systems, namely, the Northeast Monsoon System (November to March) and the Southwest Monsoon System (June to October). Of these systems, the Northeast Monsoon greatly affects the coast and the wind-driven circulation of the bay seems to be directed towards the coast.

General Santos City Hall

General Santos City is a 1st class highly urbanized city in Soccsksargen, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 594,446 people.

Located on the island of Mindanao, it is the southernmost and 15th-most populous city in the Philippines. It is the regional center for commerce and industry of the Soccsksargen region, and is geographically located within the province of South Cotabato but administered independently of it.

Formerly known as Dadiangas, city is named after Gen. Paulino Santos, a former Commanding General of the Philippine Army, and the settlement's leading pioneer.



History

The nomadic B'laan people are the original inhabitants of General Santos, and traces of their early settlement of the area are found in the city's place names, which are derived from their vocabulary. Their name for the city, Dadiangas, is from the thorny Ziziphus spina-christi tree that was once abundant in the area and is now a protected species under Republic Act 8371 or the Indigenous Peoples Right Act of 2007. The B'laan tribe presently lives alongside the city's new generation of settlers and other immigrants.

Waves of Migration

Organized under the National Land Settlement Administration (NLSA) of the Commonwealth Government headed by President Manuel L. Quezon, General Paulino Santos led the relocation of 62 Christian settlers from Luzon to the shores of Sarangani Bay aboard the steam ship “Basilan” of Compañia Maritima on February 27, 1939. The 62 pioneers, mostly agricultural and trade graduates, were the first large batch of settlers to land in the area with the mission to industriously cultivate the region. After this first influx of pioneers, thousands more Christians from Luzon and the Visayas have subsequently moved into the area, gradually driving some of the resident B'laan to the mountains, who have lost their livelihood.

In March 1939, the first formal settlement in the city was established in Alagao, which is now known as Barangay Lagao. Lagao district was known then as the "Municipal District of Buayan" under the jurisdiction of the deputy governor of the Municipal District of Glan. Until it officially became an independent Municipal District of Buayan on October 1, 1940, appointing Datu Sharif Zainal Abedin—an Arab mestizo married to a daughter of a very influential datu of lower Buayan—as the first district municipal mayor.

Second World War

During the Second World War, the Municipal District of Buayan become one of the last frontiers between the combined American and Filipino forces and troops from the Empire of Japan. Retreating Imperial Japanese forces made Klaja Karsts Land their last ground for defence, constructing round cement bunkers and tunnels. These bunkers can still be seen at Sitio Guadalupe; most of the tunnels, however, have since been damaged and even destroyed by treasure hunters and land developers.


Renaming and elevation to city status

A year after the Philippines regained full sovereignty from the United States on July 4, 1946, the Municipality of Buayan became a 4th class regular municipality by virtue of the Executive Order Number 82, dated August 18, 1947 by President Manuel Roxas, absorbing the Municipal District of Glan whose low income bracket at the time disqualified it for the honour. Dadiangas was the seat of government for the Municipality of Buayan electing Irineo Santiago as its first Municipal Mayor on a local election that was held on November 11, 1947. Mayor Santiago was formally inducted on January 1, 1948.

Six years later, in June 1954, the Municipality of Buayan was renamed General Santos as a tribute to the leading pioneer via Act No. 1107[6] authored by Congressman Luminog Mangelen of Cotabato Province.


From 1963 to 1967, the municipality's economy experienced a boom under Mayor Lucio A. Velayo, as several large agri-based and multinational firms such as Dole Philippines, General Milling Corporation and UDAGRI expanded into the area. Although it was then qualified to become a fourth class city from being a municipality, the residents rejected a move by Congressman Salipada Pendatun to convert the Municipality of Buayan into a city and to rename it ’’Rajah Buayan’’.

On July 8, 1968, the Municipality of General Santos was converted into a city upon the approval of Republic Act No. 5412, authored by Congressman James L. Chiongbian. It was inaugurated on September 5 of that year, with Antonio C. Acharon became the new city's first mayor. On the 5th of September in the year 1988, A decade after its inauguration as a chartered city, GenSan was declared a highly urbanized city of South Cotabato.



Geography

General Santos City lies at the southern part of the Philippines. It is located at 6°7'N 125°10'E latitude. The city is southeast of Manila, southeast of Cebu and southwest of Davao.

The city is bounded by municipalities of Sarangani Province namely Alabel in the east, and Maasim in the south. General Santos is likewise bounded by the South Cotabato municipality of Polomolok and Sarangani Province municipality of Malungon in the north, and the municipality of T'boli in the west.

Climate

General Santos City has a tropical wet and dry climate (Köppen climate classification Aw). It is considered to be one of the driest places in the Philippines, even with a less pronounced dry season.

There are two major languages spoken in the city, with Cebuano being widely spoken and being used by the local media outlets in the city (Television, radio, and newspapers) followed by Ilonggo, which is used mainly by settlers who came from the provinces of South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, North Cotabato and Maguindanao, as well as immigrants from the provinces of Negros Occidental, Iloilo and Guimaras.

Religion

The predominant religion in the city is Christianity, with the largest denomination being the Catholic Church, comprising almost 90 percent of the population. Some 8 percent self-identified as belonging to one of several Protestant churches, including the Aglipayan Church, the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Jehovah's Witnesses, and various Alliance, Baptist, Born Again, Church of God, Evangelical, Methodist and Pentecostal groups. Included also in this percentage is the Iglesia ni Cristo.

The remaining 2 percent belong to non-Christian faiths, particularly Islam.



Economy

The city's major economic activity is primarily anchored in two sectors namely the agro-industry and fishing industry.

Agro-Industry

 Endowed with rich volcanic soil, ample and well distributed rainfall all throughout the year and a typhoon-free climate, General Santos City produces export quality high valued crops such as corn, coconut, pineapple, asparagus, banana and rice. It also yields quality exotic fruits, vegetables and cut flowers. The city is also a top producer and exporter of quality livestock such as poultry, hogs, and cattle. But with the continuing growth in population and economy in the passing of time, a number of the city's agricultural lands have gradually been converted into built up areas in order to address the relatively growing need of dwelling and viable spaces.

Fishing Industry

 General Santos City is the largest producer of sashimi-grade tuna in the Philippines.Thus in as early as 1970, the title "Tuna Capital of the Philippines" has become a tag to it. GenSan also accounts for the second largest daily total catch of fish in the country after Navotas City in the National Capital Region. Locals in the city boast that fishes and seafoods do not come fresher than what is found in their locality. The fishing industry in GenSan yields a total daily capacity of 750 metric tons of fish catch alone and employs about 7,800 workers. Which is why General Santos City is home to seven (7) tuna processing plants in the country. The Fishport Complex in Barangay Tambler has a 750 metres (2,460 ft) quay and a 300 metres (980 ft) wharf for 2,000 GT reefer carriers. The fishport is equipped with modern facilities that comply with international standards on fish catch handling.
General Santos City has registered 1,365 new medium to large enterprises in 2011. An aggregate investment involved is estimated PHP 1.202 billion. Top industry for new investment in 2011 are as follows: Hotel and Restaurant-31%; Wholesale & Retail Trade-20%; Repair of Motor Vehicles, Motorcycles and Personal & Household Goods, Real Estate & Renting Business Activities-17%; Other Community, Social & Personal Services-8%; Financial Intermediation-5%; Manufacturing-5%; Fishing-3%; ICT-3 %

As of 2000, there are 59 banks serving the city. This composed of 46 commercial banks, 5 savings banks, 7 rural banks and 1 cooperative bank. Aside from this, there are 48 lending institutions as well as 49 pawnshops providing emergency loan assistance.



Shopping

General Santos City is the shopping capital of the Soccksargen region. Residents from nearby towns and provinces visit the city to do shopping and enjoy life and leisure activities. There are several huge shopping malls in the city, notable ones are KCC Mall of Gensan, SM City General Santos, Robinsons Place GenSan, Gaisano Mall of GenSan, RD Plaza (Fitmart), Veranza Mall, and the newest addition to the city which is RD City Mall located at Brgy. Calumpang and Unitop Shopping Mall in Brgy. Dadingas West. SM Savemore has two branches in the city and another branch will be built within the downtown area. There are also news about building an Ayala Mall and Puregold. These malls are home to both national and international brands of retail merchandises as well as restaurants and cafes. There are many merchandise and large groceries owned by local and foreign Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean businessmen in the city.